Security Without Nuclear Deterrence, Second edition 2014.


Security Without Nuclear Deterrence


By Commander Robert Green, Royal Navy (Ret'd)

Foreword by General Sir Hugh Beach and General Lord David Ramsbotham
Introduction by Dr Rebecca Johnson

Synopsis
Reviews
Table of Contents

 

Aotearoa / New Zealand at the World Court



Image

by Kate Dewes and Robert Green

This booklet describes the role New Zealanders played in challenging the legality of the testing, use and threat of nuclear weapons, at the World Court in The Hague. In 1996 the Court issued an Advisory Opinion confirming the general illegality of the threat or use of these weapons, and called on all governments to bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to complete nuclear disarmament under strict and effective international control.

 

 

Full text available in PDF format (English Version)

Introduction

Full text available in PDF format (Japanese Version)

 

The World Court Project

Image



by Kate Dewes

This thesis analyses how, over ten years from 1986-96, a worldwide network of peace activists, doctors and lawyers evolved the World Court Project (WCP), an unprecedented citizens' initiative which helped to persuade the UN to request the International Court of Justice (ICJ) for an advisory opinion on the legal status of nuclear weapons. After the largest participation by governments in a case, the ICJ confirmed that the threat or use of nuclear weapons would generally be illegal.

Downloadable at University of New England website.

 

Pacific Women Speak Out for Independence and Denuclearisation



Edited by Zohl dé Ishtar

ImageEleven indigenous women from 9 Pacific countries give personal testimony to the continued suffering from the effects of colonialism and nuclear militarism. These inspiring voices of survival and strength range from Belau in US-controlled Micronesia, to the French colony of Tahiti in Polynesia, to West Papua under Indonesian military control. Their personal accounts challenge the romantic images often held about the Pacific.

Edited by Zohl dé Ishtar and published jointly in 1998 by the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (Aotearoa), the Disarmament & Security Centre (Aotearoa/New Zealand) and Pacific Connections (Australia), it is dedicated to Darlene Keju-Johnson, who died of cancer in 1996.

Full text available in PDF format

Japanese Translation available

 

The Naked Nuclear Emperor: Debunking Nuclear Deterrence


by Robert Green
Synopsis

Image

It has now become clear that the nuclear weapon states, led by the US, UK and France, cite nuclear deterrence doctrine as the final, indispensable justification for maintaining their nuclear arsenals. Nuclear deterrence must therefore be debunked and alternatives offered if there is to be any serious prospect of eliminating nuclear weapons.

Although a vast literature exists on the subject, it is discursive, fragmented and academic. Many powerful arguments are buried deep in inaccessible volumes. To my knowledge, no attempt has been made since the end of the Cold War to draw together, in a concise form, a comprehensive critique of nuclear deterrence doctrine and safer alternative approaches to achieving security. That is why this booklet is needed.

Re-Thinking Nuclear Deterrence: Summary of Arguments from The Naked Nuclear Emperor


Image



by Commander Robert D. Green, Royal Navy (Retired)

In 24 pages, this booklet summarises the arguments from The Naked Nuclear Emperor while omitting the endnotes.

Full text available in PDF format

 

 

Fast Track to Zero Nuclear Weapons



Image

by Robert Green

Even opinion polls in the US and UK show that 87 per cent of those polled want their governments to negotiate an enforceable global treaty banning nuclear weapons, like the widely-acclaimed one for chemical weapons.

Written by Robert Green, this Briefing Book is published by the Middle Powers Initiative and aims to help transform this overwhelming wish into political movement. It highlights the deepening nuclear weapon crisis, discusses the feasibility and desirability of rapid nuclear disarmament, and explores the role that middle power governments, supported by civil society, can play in advancing such a goal.

Full text available in PDF format